CINNAMON, a memorable herb

As we continue to enjoy the brightness and warmth of summer, we are reminded that Fire is fuel for creativity energy.  Leo rules the height of summer and the life force is strong.  The “medicine” provided for us to keep the balance is cinnamon, referred to here as Cinnamomum verum or Cinnamomum cassia.

Summer. Photo credit: Colin-47 / Foter / Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
Summer. Photo credit: Colin-47 / Foter / Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Background Information:

Other names are Sweet wood, Laurus cinnamomum, Canton cassia, Cassia Aromaticum, Cassia Linnea

cinnamomum-verum-vs-cinnamomum-burmannii
Cinnamomum Verum vs Cinnamomum Burmannii. Photo credit: Foter / Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 1.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 1.0)

Family:  Lauraceae

General Characteristics

There are 250 recognized species of Cinnamomum; Cinnamomum verum is a small evergreen tree that grows up to 35 feet tall. It grows in Southeast Asia. The bark is highly aromatic. The characteristic cinnamon fragrance comes from a compound in the essential oil known as cinnamaldehyde.

The bark of the tree is harvested, cut long-wise, peeled, and dried to form cinnamon sticks (also known as quills).  The constituents of the bark are essential oils, poly-phenols, coumarins, cinnamaldehyde, tannins, iron, magnesium, zinc, and mucilage.

Actions of Cinnamomum include antiseptic, antiviral, anti-fungal, antioxidant (from poly-phenols), digestive aid, mild emmenagogue, stabilizer for blood sugar levels especially for Type 2 Diabetes .

Cautions:  The volatile oils used directly on the skin (“neat”) may cause a burning sensation or rash; the small amount of coumarin (blood thinner) should be used with close monitoring by anyone having any blood issues or having any kind of surgery. It is recommended that cinnamon not be used for one week prior to and one week after surgery.

Beneficial cinnamon combinations:

Cinnamon + Ashwagandha (with milk) to promote sleep

Cinnamon + Ginger (tea) to relieve stomach cramps, menstrual cramps, bloated feeling

Cinnamon + honey for a flavorful way to use honey (soothing)

Cinnamon tincture for stabilizing blood sugar

Cinnamon (powder)+ Stevia to use on fruit, plain low-fat yogurt, cooked cereal, and other combinations.

Magickal:

General metaphysical:  Masculine, Sun, Fire

Astrological:  Primary is Leo; Secondary is Aries, Leo, Saggitarius

God Associations:  Helios, Orunla, Ra, Surya

Goddess Associations:  Aphrodite, Ochun, Oya, Venus

Cinnamon has been documented back to ancient Egypt where it was used in mummification rites and to honor the Gods. Cinnamon was included in incense, used in Greek, Roman, and Egyptian temples. In modern times, cinnamon is a major constituent of incenses used to attract love, money and increased psychic energies. Cinnamon is some times used in initiation oil blends with the intent of causing a memorable sensation (use “neat” with caution).

 

Fire Incense / Tincture Blend  (from A Wiccan Formulary and Herbal)

2 parts Cinnamon
1 part Dragon’s Blood
1 part Frankincense
Sufficient “Fire” or allspice oil to bind
Used to communicate the qualities of Fire; used at the South quarter altar. The smoke is used to consecrate a new athame.

Cinnamon is a memorable herb ~ fresh baked cookies, seasonal warmth, family and friends, a comforting herb.  Medicinal, magickal and memorable! Share your uses and enjoyment of Cinnamomum verum / Cinnamomum cassia through this blog and learn some new and wonderful ways to invite cinnamon to work with you.

Special note: This article is for educational purposes only. The information is not meant to replace the consultation of a licensed health-care professional. This author and OCLC-CoG are not held responsible for the use or misuse of the information contained within this blog.

Blessed Be!

 

References:

Summer. Photo credit: Colin-47 / Foter / Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Cinnamon. Photo credit: Foter / Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 1.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 1.0)

Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner’s Guide  by Rosemary Gladstar. Storey Publishing  2012   Pg. 64 -69

National Geographic Guide to Medicinal Herbs by Rebecca Johnson & Steven Foster, Tieraona Low Dog (M.D.) & David Kiefer (M.D.).  National Geographic   2010    Pg. 100-101, 110-113

A Wiccan Formulary and Herbal   By A. J. Drew.  The Career Press    2005    Pg. 104, 191-192

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